A Guy With Suicidal Depression Turns To Ancient Plant Medicine for Relief

Rapé (pronounced Hape) is a Shamanic snuff medicine from South America made from powdered plants and herbs that are mixed with a highly potent tobacco base.

By Amy Spencer
January 8, 2020

When you’ve been on the brink of ending your life, you’re likely to consider alternative treatments to reach and heal the root of your issues. For writer and life coach Myles Scott, that treatment is an ancient plant medicine from Brazil called rapé (pronounced ha-peh).

Growing up, Scott always felt like an outsider and endured cruel bullying for being short, Jewish and vegan. After high school, those traumatic experiences turned into toxic behaviors. And after one particularly toxic relationship ended up in a dramatic break up, “I became suicidal,” says Scott. “I had a suicidal depression.”

And while he worked through the worst of his depression, his anxiety never abated. So in an attempt to finally rid himself of it, Scott turned to energy work practitioner Malcolm Ian Cross on a new kind of therapy using rapé, a plant medicine from the Amazon.

Rapé is a Shamanic snuff medicine from South America made from powdered plants and herbs that are mixed with a highly potent tobacco base. The practitioner administers the medicine through the nostrils using a V-shaped ceremonial pipe called a Tepi, which is said to cause an intense burning sensation, followed by feelings most often described as both stimulating and grounding. For this reason, rapé is often used in conjunction with Ayahuasca ceremonies to help with purging or moving stuck energies.

Cross administers the medicine to both of Scott’s nostrils, encouraging him to focus on grounding himself as the medicine does its work. The hope is that rapé might help Scott address the lingering feelings from his past that “I know I have suppressed,” says Scott, “and they have become repressed.”

Watch the Outlier video to see Scott participate in his very first rapé ceremony.

About the Writer:
Amy Spencer is a Los Angeles-based journalist who has written cover stories for Parade, Men’s Journal, New York magazine and Glamour and has written three books about happiness and optimism, including Bright Side Up recommended by O, the Oprah Magazine.

Outlier Disclaimer

This site is for educational purposes and not a substitute for professional medical care by a doctor or otherwise qualified medical professional. The information provided by Outlier Magazine is on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services.

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