Music Artist Experiments With Sananga Drops To Cure Anxiety (Video)

Through its painful stinging sensation, it’s believed, it will release physical and psychological lethargy and stagnation, inviting clarity and new perspectives into people’s lives.

By Amy Spencer
January 8, 2020

Shay Bella, a music artist who resides in Los Angeles, is one of more than 40 million Americans adults who suffer from anxiety disorder and it interferes with her work as a live performer.

“My heart would start racing and I’m just trying to learn how to relax,” and “just  breathe,” she told Outlier.

She’s even begun putting herself in circumstances that elicit a heart racing stress response in the hopes of transcending her stage fright and discomfort. “I like to go to karaoke bars and put myself in those situations where I’m like, ‘OK, I can do this,’ she said. Her goal is to learn how to ground herself in the moment with deep mindful breaths to be natural in front of an audience.

To help manage her ongoing battle with anxiety, she’s recently turned to the plant-based medicine sananga, extracted from the root shrub Tabernaemontana undulata. According to her healer, Malcolm Ian Cross, it descends from Kaxinawa (aka. Huni Kuin) a tribe native to Brazil, where it was historically used to improve vision and lucidity for evening hunts. It’s also thought to purify the mind: Through its painful stinging sensation, it’s believed, it will release physical and psychological lethargy and stagnation, inviting clarity and new perspectives into people’s lives. 

“It is a very, very powerful medicine and it has a very, very dramatic effect when you use it, but the results are amazing,” he says. Highlighting the fundamental ways sananga has impacted his own life, he says: “It really, really pushes my relationship with my pain threshold and in a sense, what I can calmly endure and that translates into my life.”

In a moving exchange between Bella and Cross in Outlier’s video above, Bella shares the aftereffects of the taking the sananga eye drops. 


About the Writer:
Amy Spencer is a Los Angeles-based journalist who has written cover stories for Parade, Men’s Journal, New York magazine and Glamour and has written three books about happiness and optimism, including Bright Side Up recommended by O, the Oprah Magazine. 

Outlier Disclaimer

This site is for educational purposes and not a substitute for professional medical care by a doctor or otherwise qualified medical professional. The information provided by Outlier Magazine is on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services.

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